Get FREE, ready to go Social Skills Resources! Join here!
Home About Social Skills Blog Shop Contact JOIN THE TEACHER'S LOUNGE Login

The Socially Skilled Kids Blog

DISTANCE LEARNING | HOW TO DO “SCHOOL FROM HOME”

 

Due to the coronavirus, many schools have gone remote.  While teachers have put a tremendous amount of effort into making the transition from school, to school from home, as easy as possible…the fact is, it’s hard!

 According to Education Week, school closures due to coronavirus have impacted over 124,000 U.S. schools and at least 55.1 million students. States have closed schools into late April or May, or even closed down for the remainder of the school year!

Parents, educators, and students have had to make the move to online or Distance Learning. This mode of teaching and learning is unfamiliar to most of us.  We are all doing our very best to figure it all out, and quickly.

As an elementary school teacher, I am seeing a lot of students {and parents} doing okay with school from home, but many too, are really struggling.  Especially our kiddos with special needs.

Challenges like technology {access and knowledge}, working...

Continue Reading...

HOW TO TARGET SOCIAL SKILLS THROUGH EASY VIDEO CONFERENCING GAMES AND ACTIVITIES

 

Remotely Teaching social skills can be an interesting challenge.  I have spent many years avoiding the use of technology in my social skills sessions.  I felt my kiddos got plenty of screen time, and what they really needed was face to face interaction.

While I still believe this, we are currently in a situation where we simply must use technology to teach.  

So how do you teach a social skills group on a video conferencing platform like Zoom or Google Meet?

By playing games, of course!  

Read my recent post about 22 Easy Games and Activities to play online HERE.

But saying it is one thing…actually doing it is another thing all together!

Our students are dealing with so much right now.  And on top of it all, they have to learn new technology and new appropriate behaviors to go with it.

I don’t know about you…but I have spent the first few weeks of remote teaching, remotely teaching my students how to behave appropriately...

Continue Reading...

TEACHING CONVERSATIONAL SKILLS TO SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS

 

Many children who are typically developing find engaging in conversations to be quite easy.  They have picked up on the necessary skills naturally and with informal practice over time and in their day-to-day interactions with others.

But for our kiddos with special needs, we may need a more explicit approach.  Conversational skills often need to be broken down into small, manageable steps.  Each of those steps may need to be explicitly taught, practiced, re-taught, practiced in multiple environments, and so on.

Before we talk about how to teach conversational skills, let’s talk about why to teach conversational skills.

Our students need to be able to engage appropriately in conversations, to have successful social interactions.  However, this is not a quick and easy skill to teach, as there are many variables to consider.

Within the context of social interactions, we have many different types of conversations; from formal to informal, chit chat to...

Continue Reading...

HOW EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS AFFECT OUR STUDENT’S SOCIAL SKILLS

 
Functioning {EF} skills are the skills we need to complete everyday tasks.  They are like the air traffic controller of our brains, coordinating everything we do, say and think. 
 
We need EF skills to pursue our goals and to live independent lives.
 
 

WHAT ARE THE EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING SKILLS?

 
The most commonly noted EF skills are:
 
  • Planning
  • Organization
  • Task Initiation
  • Time Management
  • Working Memory
  • Metacognition
  • Self Control
  • Attention
  • Flexibility
  • Perseverance

 

 

GRAB THIS FREE DOWNLOAD BY JOINING MY FREEBIES’S CLUB:

THE TEACHER’S LOUNGE, BY FILLING OUT THE FORM BELOW

 

SOME ADDITIONAL SKILLS THAT ARE CONSIDERED TO BE EF SKILLS ARE:

  • Verbal Reasoning
  • Emotional Control
  • Impulse Control
  • Self Monitoring
  • Prioritizing
  • Decision Making
  • Perspective Taking
 
Wow!  As you can see, there are A LOT of skills involved in Executive Functioning.
 
When a student is challenged in EF, is it any...
Continue Reading...

THE BEST WAYS TO DECREASE CHALLENGING BEHAVIORS

 
Challenging Behaviors are always a hot topic and could probably be discussed 
All. Year. Long.
 
But when you think about it, we really do talk about challenging behaviors all year long, because we talk about social skills.  And I believe, that most challenging behaviors are a direct result of a lack of social skills. 
 
 
 
Of course, there are some mental health disorders that can cause very significant behavior challenges, for example, Oppositional Defiance Disorder {ODD} and Conduct Disorder {CD), but for the purposes of this discussion, we will be talking about challenging behaviors that are most likely due to a lack of, or poorly developed, social skills.
 
This social skills deficit may be due to factors such as; Autism, ADHD, Anxiety, Developmental Delay, Speech and Language Delay, Learning Disabilities or Environmental Factors.
 
With the support of the student’s Team, we can have a positive...
Continue Reading...

UNDERSTANDING THE DEVELOPMENT {AND SPLINTER SKILLS} OF PERSPECTIVE TAKING

Engaging successfully in Perspective Taking requires a lot of  “splinter skills.”

While there is a developmental scope and sequence for Perspective Taking, for our kiddos, development is usually uneven, and skills are often scattered; leaving us trying to figure out what to teach, much like a puzzle.

 

 

I recommend spending some time figuring out, as best you can, where the student is at {in their perspective taking development} and which skills are lacking.  Then, start your teaching with the developmentally earliest skill on that list, and move along up the scale as you see success.

 

WHAT IS THE TYPICAL DEVELOPMENT OF PERSPECTIVE TAKING?

 

Here is a very basic overview:

Preschoolers:  These kiddos are just starting to figure out that people can have different feelings than they do.  This is at a very basic level…they mostly still think that other people share their feelings. 

 Kindergarten – Second...

Continue Reading...

UNDERSTANDING AND TEACHING PERSPECTIVE TAKING IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

WHAT IS PERSPECTIVE TAKING?

 
Perspective Taking is the ability to look beyond one’s own point of view and consider how others may feel about something.  To take another’s perspective, one must have Theory of Mind, that is, understand that others have thoughts, feelings and opinions that may be different and are independent of your own. 
 

Why is Perspective Taking Important?

 
  • Because we do not live in isolation {We are often around others}
  • Because we often feel differently or have different experiences {than do our peers} 
  • Because we need to take perspective to successfully work and play with others
  • Because perspective taking allows us to make and keep friends {jobs and romantic partners}
 

So how can we help our special students, develop and improve their perspective taking skills?

 

 

Below is a list of some important splinter skills that I think are essential to teach, in order to improve their...
Continue Reading...

HOW TO RESPOND TO THE STUDENT WHO ALWAYS ARGUES

Do you have a student who is always arguing and/or analyzing everything you {and their peers} say or do?  Do they debate even the smallest of requests that you make?  Do they become argumentative with peers, even those who are trying to be friendly to them, cause them to have few or challenging friendships? 

Students who constantly argue can be very frustrating!

Figuring Out The “Why”

 

The first thing I always do, is try to pinpoint the reason for the behavior.

Why is the student engaging in  this behavior?  What is he/she trying to say?  Beyond the words, what message is he sending?

Students who engage in this type of behavior are often seeking control. They want to control the situation, the conversation, the game, etc.  This is usually due to challenges with; Rigid Thinking, Poor Understanding of Empathy, Poor Understanding of Point of View, Perspective Taking, and Fact vs. Opinion. 

Some students also have low self...

Continue Reading...

TOP 10 WAYS TO RESPOND TO DEFIANT BEHAVIOR IN THE CLASSROOM

 

Defiant behavior in the classroom is a reality for all teachers.  Classroom teachers, special subject teachers and assistant teachers, all have to respond to a variety of defiant behavior(s), sometimes, on a daily basis.  Defiant behavior(s) also affects the other students who share space with those who are struggling.

 

Some, experience severe behaviors.  This post will address mild-moderately defiant behaviors.  These are behaviors that are unsettling and/or disruptive to your teaching, including; non-compliance, arguing and being rude and disrespectful.

*The strategies discussed here and the Freebies passed along, are not intended for significantly defiant behaviors that may be dangerous to you or the student.  Those behaviors and related strategies are outside of the scope of this blog post.  For help with excessively aggressive or dangerous behavior, seek the help of a qualified mental health professional and or behavior...

Continue Reading...

HOW AND WHY TO TEACH STUDENTS TEAMWORK AND COOPERATION

 
This time of year I tend to put a lot of focus on the explicit teaching of two very important social skills; Teamwork and Cooperation
 
Of course, teamwork and cooperation are essential skills all-year-long, and are used in nearly every activity in school and in life.
 
For me, the importance of teamwork and cooperation really seems to stand out, as I watch my students to playing sports and games at recess, and engaging in cooperative activities on the playground in in their classrooms. 
 
 
Teamwork and Cooperation are defined very similarly, and my students always tell me they are the same thing.
 
But there are some subtle and important differences that I like to keep in mind.
 

Let’s start with Teamwork.

 

Teamwork is defined as:
 
A collaborative effort to achieve a common goal or complete a task.
 
 
Why is teamwork so important? 
 
Because we need to use teamwork in pretty much all...
Continue Reading...
1 2
Close

50% Complete

Join The Teacher's Lounge

Sign-up and receive your first free resource today:
Social Skills Mindset Activity